Tamsui

Fort San Domingo

The port town of Tamsui 4 [map] , where the MRT Tamsui Line terminates, has a rich historical heritage. This was the main point of contact in northern Taiwan between the Chinese and foreign traders during its heyday as the island’s major port in the late 19th century. Even before that, the Spanish – who had occupied Keelung – extended their claim to Tamsui, where, in 1629, they built a fort, Fort San Domingo (Hongmao Cheng; http://en.tshs.ntpc.gov.tw ; Mon–Fri 9.30am–5pm, Sat–Sun 9.30am–6pm), on one of the hills close to the river. After the Spanish were booted out, Tamsui was occupied by the Dutch until 1662, bombarded by French warships in 1884, and claimed by the Japanese in 1895. The Japanese built the island’s first golf course in Tamsui, on a plateau just above the fort, now known as the Taiwan Golf and Country Club. Opened in 1919, the club remains popular among visitors and residents alike.

Today, the fort is a primary Tamsui attraction. It may be a relatively modest affair, but the bright orange-red structure atop a small hill overlooking the mouth of the Tamsui River encapsulates much of Taiwan’s history: first built by the Spanish, rebuilt by the Dutch, taken over by Chinese Ming and Today, the fort is a primary Tamsui attraction. It may be a relatively modest affair, but the bright orange-red structure atop a small hill overlooking the mouth of the Tamsui River encapsulates much of Taiwan’s history: first built by the Spanish, rebuilt by the Dutch, taken over by Chinese Ming and

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